About Cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies.

What's On

  • When?
  • Or

Now showing at Scott Cinemas Penel Orlieu,Bridgwater,Somerset TA6 3PH 0871 230 3200

  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • The Angry Birds Movie
  • X-Men: Apocalypse
  • X-Men: Apocalypse 3D

Florence Foster Jenkins 4 stars

Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair. The couple auditions several accompanists and Cosme Moon lands the position of Florence's pianist. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else.

  • GenreBiography, Comedy, Drama, Historical/Period, Musical, Romance
  • CastMeryl Streep, Hugh Grant, Simon Helberg, Rebecca Ferguson.
  • DirectorStephen Frears.
  • WriterNicholas Martin.
  • CountryUK/Fr
  • Duration110 mins
  • Official site
  • Release06/05/2016

Auditions for televised talent shows throw up a limitless supply of deluded wannabes, who refuse to let a lack of musicality or rhythm hamper their quest for pop superstardom. Occasionally, these lovable misfits strike a chord because of their unfettered enthusiasm - witness the inexorable rise of The Cheeky Girls and Jedward. Amateur operatic soprano Florence Foster Jenkins was one such endearing eccentric, who became a cause celebre in 1930s and 1940s New York precisely because she was unable to hold a note during her infamous recitals of Verdi, Brahms and Mozart. Recordings of her caterwauling became collector's items and her concerts were always sold out. Jenkins brought joy to millions and remained convinced of her soaring abilities until her glorious end, aged 76. This real-life story of triumph against sniggering cynicism provides rich inspiration for Stephen Frears' rollicking comedy drama. Anchored by tour-de-force performances from Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant that perfectly harmonise humour and pathos, Florence Foster Jenkins is an unabashedly joyful period piece that stands resolutely behind the eponymous socialite as she massacres the Laughing Song from Die Fledermaus or the Queen Of The Night aria from The Magic Flute. As the heroine remarks, "People may say I couldn't sing but no one can say I didn't sing." Florence (Streep) is determined to further her musical ambitions with the help of her second husband and doting companion, St Clair (Grant). "I shall need a pianist. Someone young, someone with passion!" declares Florence excitedly. The couple auditions several accompanists but they fail to meet Florence's exacting standards. "He's raping my ears. Make him stop!" she pleads after one hopeful tinkles the ivories. Cosme Moon (Simon Helberg) eventually lands the position of Florence's pianist and his first experience of Florence in full voice is played for tear-streaming belly laughs by Frears. The grand dame pays Cosme well and he gradually falls under his wealthy employer's spell, acknowledging that she is just following her dream, like everyone else. Vocal coach Carlo Edwards (David Haig) and venerated conductor Arturo Toscanini (John Kavanagh) prepare Florence for a big concert at the world-famous Carnegie Hall. However, St Clair worries that the stress of the forthcoming engagement is playing havoc with her faltering health. "What if it kills you?" he frets. "Then I shall die happy," smiles Florence serenely. Audiences will certainly die happy after watching Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep is mesmerising, bringing tenderness and vulnerability to a role that could so easily have been played as a pitiful figure of mockery. Grant is a wonderful comic foil and he demonstrates a light touch in moving scenes that remind us of his oft-ignored abilities as a dramatic actor. Period design is impeccable and Frears builds to a rousing emotional crescendo worthy of one of Jenkins' standing ovations. Bravo!

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 25th May 2016
Thursday 26th May 2016

The Angry Birds Movie 3 stars

Red is an outcast on Bird Island, where the rest of his flightless flock tweet peace and harmony. An unfortunate incident with an unhatched egg lands Red in court where Judge Peckinpah sentences him to a course in anger management led by perky clucker Matilda. When a ship full of pigs led by smooth talker Leonard arrives on Bird Island, supposedly in peace, Red is the only inhabitant to sense impending disaster.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Animation/Cartoon, Comedy, Family, Family
  • CastPeter Dinklage, Kate McKinnon, Jason Sudeikis, Josh Gad, Sean Penn, Bill Hader, Maya Rudolph, Danny McBride.
  • DirectorClay Kaytis, Fergal Reilly.
  • WriterJon Vitti.
  • CountryFin/US
  • Duration97 mins
  • Official sitewww.angrybirds-movie.com/en/
  • Release13/05/2016

Strip back the pristine visuals, which were once meticulously hand-drawn, and most animated films are hard-wired with an important life lesson to cherish once the end credits roll. The Lion King: you can't run away from your responsibilities; Beauty And The Beast: don't judge someone by their appearance; Frozen: don't let naysayers hold you back from chasing your dreams; Inside Out: feeling sad is a natural part of growing up; Monsters, Inc.: mummy fibbed when she said the scary creature under your bed isn't real. The Angry Birds Movie, a feature-length animated spin-off from the fiendishly addictive smartphone games, tears out a new page from the self-help manual: it's OK to get mad as long as you can channel that aggression in a positive direction. The central character of Clay Kaytis and Fergal Reilly's film certainly spits feathers in the pursuit of a greater good. Screenwriter Jon Vitti peppers this haphazard, but energetic flight of self-discovery with a barrage of dreadful puns and dad jokes that will inspire as many groans as giggles. Thus, one anger-management therapist bird proudly advertises herself as a free-rage chicken, pigs aspire to wear Calvin Swine underwear, and a poster advertises Kevin Bacon's return to the stage in... Hamlet. Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis) is an outcast on Bird Island, where the rest of his flightless flock tweet peace and harmony. An unfortunate incident with an unhatched egg lands Red in court where Judge Peckinpah (Keegan-Michael Key) sentences him to a course in anger management led by perky clucker Matilda (Maya Rudolph). Fellow attendees include wide-cracking live wire Chuck (Josh Gad), who can move at superbird speed, the aptly named Bomb (Danny McBride), who self-combusts when surprised or stressed, and hulking Terence (Sean Penn), who communicates in booming growls. Red resists Matilda's techniques because, as he reminds his brethren, "We're descended from dinosaurs. We're not supposed to be nice." When a ship full of pigs led by smooth talker Leonard (Bill Hader) arrives on Bird Island, supposedly in peace, Red is the only inhabitant to sense impending disaster. Other birds fail to heed his warnings and when his doom-laden prophecy comes to pass, Red joins forces with Chuck and Bomb to locate the island's mysterious protector, Mighty Eagle (Peter Dinklage). The Angry Birds Movie is a glossy promo for the games and associated merchandise, showcasing the different birds and their associated powers, but it's also a lot of fun so long as you ignore the flimsy and predictable plot. Animation quality doesn't soar to the dizzy heights of Pixar, but co-directors Kaytis and Reilly maintain a brisk pace and the screen shimmers with bright colours. Vocal performances are solid and Demi Lovato's cover version of the Gloria Gaynor discoball classic I Will Survive flaps up the feel-good factor.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 25th May 2016
Thursday 26th May 2016

X-Men: Apocalypse 3 stars

The very first mutant, En Sabah Nur, aka Apocalypse, reawakens after thousands of years. He is disgusted by the pitiful state of mankind and resolves to clean the evolutionary slate by creating a new world order with the help of his four horsemen of the apocalypse: Angel, Psylocke, Storm and Magneto. Professor X and Raven are determined to protect mankind at all costs and they assemble a team of young X-Men to avert armageddon.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Family, Fantasy, Science Fiction
  • CastOlivia Munn, Jennifer Lawrence, Sophie Turner, Evan Peters, Michael Fassbender, Nicholas Hoult, James McAvoy, Oscar Isaac.
  • DirectorBryan Singer.
  • WriterSimon Kinberg.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration144 mins
  • Official sitewww.xmenmovies.com
  • Release18/05/2016

Too many kooks spoil the broth of director Bryan Singer's fourth tour of duty with the Marvel Comics mutants, which began in 2000 with X-Men. Simon Kinberg's messy script bursts at the seams with tortured characters and subplots vying for our attention, bloating the running time to close to two and a half hours. It's a physical ordeal for us, but too little time for X-Men: Apocalypse to do justice to a menagerie of gifted misfits on both sides of a conflict that reduces several capital cities to rubble. There is dramatic fat that could be trimmed: a blood-spattered interlude involving a face from the past - codenamed Weapon X - is superfluous and the final showdown is played out simultaneously in the real world and inside the connected minds of telepaths. The arch-villain is omnipotent - he slaughters an entire factory of workmen with a casual swipe of his hand - and could conceivably destroy mankind without breaking computer-generated sweat. Instead, this otherworldly tyrant chooses to waste precious time recruiting less powerful mutants to do his bidding and consequently undermines his nefarious plan to wipe clean the evolutionary slate. Ten years have passed since the cataclysmic events of X-Men: Days Of Future Past, which saw Logan (Hugh Jackman) travel back in time to 1973 to make contact with the young Professor X (James McAvoy) and Magneto (Michael Fassbender) and neutralise the Sentinel program of killer robots. It's now the early 1980s and the very first mutant, En Sabah Nur (Oscar Isaac), reawakens after thousands of years of inactivity. He is disgusted by the pitiful state of mankind and resolves to create a new world order with the help of his four devoted horsemen of the apocalypse: Angel (Ben Hardy), Psylocke (Olivia Munn), Storm (Alexandra Shipp) and Magneto. Professor X and Raven (Jennifer Lawrence) vow to protect mankind and they assemble a team of young X-Men to avert armageddon including Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Jean Grey (Sophie Turner), Quicksilver (Evan Peters), Nightcrawler (Kodi Smit-McPhee), Havok (Lucas Till) and his younger brother Cyclops (Tye Sheridan). X-Men: Apocalypse doesn't settle long enough on one narrative thread to generate dramatic momentum or suspense. Turner and Sheridan make the biggest impact, capturing the inner turmoil of teenagers unable to control their unique and potentially devastating powers. Apart from one rallying cry, Lawrence is surplus to requirements, while McAvoy stares teary-eyed into the camera as his romantic subplot with CIA agent Moira MacTaggert (Rose Byrne) is resuscitated. Special effects have improved in superhuman leaps since Singer's first foray into this universe. He blitzkriegs the screen with eye-popping digital trickery, guaranteeing a relentless assault on the eyes - especially in 3D - which is just as likely to induce a headache as awe and wonder.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 25th May 2016
Thursday 26th May 2016

X-Men: Apocalypse 3D 3 stars

The very first mutant, En Sabah Nur, aka Apocalypse, reawakens after thousands of years. He is disgusted by the pitiful state of mankind and resolves to clean the evolutionary slate by creating a new world order with the help of his four horsemen of the apocalypse: Angel, Psylocke, Storm and Magneto. Professor X and Raven are determined to protect mankind at all costs and they assemble a team of young X-Men to avert armageddon.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Adventure, Family, Fantasy, Science Fiction
  • CastJennifer Lawrence, Olivia Munn, Sophie Turner, Michael Fassbender, Nicholas Hoult, James McAvoy, Oscar Isaac, Evan Peters.
  • DirectorBryan Singer.
  • WriterSimon Kinberg.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration144 mins
  • Official sitewww.xmenmovies.com
  • Release18/05/2016

Too many kooks spoil the broth of director Bryan Singer's fourth tour of duty with the Marvel Comics mutants, which began in 2000 with X-Men. Simon Kinberg's messy script bursts at the seams with tortured characters and subplots vying for our attention, bloating the running time to close to two and a half hours. It's a physical ordeal for us, but too little time for X-Men: Apocalypse to do justice to a menagerie of gifted misfits on both sides of a conflict that reduces several capital cities to rubble. There is dramatic fat that could be trimmed: a blood-spattered interlude involving a face from the past - codenamed Weapon X - is superfluous and the final showdown is played out simultaneously in the real world and inside the connected minds of telepaths. The arch-villain is omnipotent - he slaughters an entire factory of workmen with a casual swipe of his hand - and could conceivably destroy mankind without breaking computer-generated sweat. Instead, this otherworldly tyrant chooses to waste precious time recruiting less powerful mutants to do his bidding and consequently undermines his nefarious plan to wipe clean the evolutionary slate. Ten years have passed since the cataclysmic events of X-Men: Days Of Future Past, which saw Logan (Hugh Jackman) travel back in time to 1973 to make contact with the young Professor X (James McAvoy) and Magneto (Michael Fassbender) and neutralise the Sentinel program of killer robots. It's now the early 1980s and the very first mutant, En Sabah Nur (Oscar Isaac), reawakens after thousands of years of inactivity. He is disgusted by the pitiful state of mankind and resolves to create a new world order with the help of his four devoted horsemen of the apocalypse: Angel (Ben Hardy), Psylocke (Olivia Munn), Storm (Alexandra Shipp) and Magneto. Professor X and Raven (Jennifer Lawrence) vow to protect mankind and they assemble a team of young X-Men to avert armageddon including Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Jean Grey (Sophie Turner), Quicksilver (Evan Peters), Nightcrawler (Kodi Smit-McPhee), Havok (Lucas Till) and his younger brother Cyclops (Tye Sheridan). X-Men: Apocalypse doesn't settle long enough on one narrative thread to generate dramatic momentum or suspense. Turner and Sheridan make the biggest impact, capturing the inner turmoil of teenagers unable to control their unique and potentially devastating powers. Apart from one rallying cry, Lawrence is surplus to requirements, while McAvoy stares teary-eyed into the camera as his romantic subplot with CIA agent Moira MacTaggert (Rose Byrne) is resuscitated. Special effects have improved in superhuman leaps since Singer's first foray into this universe. He blitzkriegs the screen with eye-popping digital trickery, guaranteeing a relentless assault on the eyes - especially in 3D - which is just as likely to induce a headache as awe and wonder.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 25th May 2016
Thursday 26th May 2016